Kolho Series

with Matthew Day Jackson

Kolho collection 02
Kolho is a series of tables and chairs formed of right angles and serpentine forms. It is inspired by Apollo landing and a small town called Kolho in Finland. The serpent represents temptation and chaos which supports the flat plane of reason. The space between Reason and Chaos is that of PLAY. This is the space where our human animal truly shows its greatest self.

Matthew Day Jackson is an American artist whose multifaceted practice encompasses sculpture, painting, collage, photography, drawing, video, performance and installation. Born in Panorama City, California, in 1974 and currently living and working on the East Coast, his art grapples with big ideas such as the evolution of human thought, the fatal attraction of the frontier and the faith that man places in technological advancement. In particular, his work addresses the myth of the American Dream, exploring the forces of creation, growth, transcendence, and death through visions of its failed utopia.

Matthew Day Jackson on Kolho

"Kolho, a small town in Finland, and a word that eludes definition in English but can be described as meaning vacant, hollow or even creepy. I happened upon Kolho while visiting the Serlachius Museum where a show of my paintings and sculptures, Maa, opens in May 2019. A conversation with curator Timo Valjakka lead to a tour of the nearby Formica factory, which led to meeting Niclas, Sebastian and Lasse of Made By Choice; which led to meeting Phil, Eva and Virginie of Formica… All of these serendipitous meetings developed into an obsession with creating a dining setting.

The story of Apollo, as both a NASA mission and the Greek the god of reason, is the genesis of this project. Apollo’s brother, Dionysus, reigns over ritual madness, theatre, pleasure, fertility, and of course, wine. The two contradictory temperaments meet at this table: the flat, rational plane of the table sits upon legs that curve and wind like a serpent or grapevine.

The tables and chairs are sculptures that evince dining as theatre. They create a space to share and create stories, with a Formica surface that promises to always wipe clean. In designing this furniture, I was seeking the space between Reason and Chaos: the state of PLAY. This is the space where our human animal shows its greatest self.

Kolho collection 11
Kolho collection 06
"I don’t see this falling outside of art at all. I think objects tell stories… I don’t see a difference between sculpture and furniture."

Listen to Matthew on Monocle Culture Show or download the press kit.